SOGTFO (Sculpture Or Get The Fuck Out) is a critical play on the misogynistic acronym TOGTFO (Tits Or Get The Fuck Out), a prompt directed at anyone claiming to be female within online boards, chats, and forums. This prompt, which bridges “accepted” adolescent immaturity and the more menacing forms of misogyny, points to the pernicious “made by and for men” sentiment that persists in cultural realms both high and low.

 

Under such hegemonic primacy, male artists tend to be elevated far above their female peers, and the notion of genius is largely reserved for men. This bias resides most resolutely in the discourse surrounding the practice of sculpture, in which an emphasis on grandeur functions as the new phallus of nations, churning out massive works for even more massive sales floors, collections, and institutions.

 

This exhibition argues against the predominantly patriarchal imagination that has defined sculptural form, and it aims to reveal the energy, intensity, and originality being forged by artists who exchange the emptiness of grand gestures for complexity, criticality, humor, and meaningful gravitas.

 

Without discrediting or disregarding history, the exhibition makes a case in and for the present—a time when the market has nearly consumed every aspect of the maker—by turning our attention to five contemporary artists whose gestures in form embody the now and point to the new in Sculpture.

 

Spanning three generations, the show introduces emerging artists Kelly Akashi, Nevine Mahmoud, and Kathleen Ryan, alongside established artists Andrea Zittel and Amanda Ross-Ho, whose radical contributions to contemporary sculptural discourse illustrate a shift in mentorship from one generation to the next. In so doing, it argues for a reevaluation of the all-too-gendered category of Genius.

 

SOGTFO is curated by Charlie White, with accompanying texts by Sarah Lehrer-Graiwer and Charlie White.

 

 

SOGTFO

Amanda Ross-Ho, Andrea Zittel, Kelly Akashi, Kathleen Ryan, Nevine Mahmoud

Curated by Charlie White

 

February 28 – April 4 2015

Opening Saturday, February 28, 7- 10pm

 

SOGTFO (Sculpture Or Get The Fuck Out) is a critical play on the misogynistic acronym TOGTFO (Tits Or Get The Fuck Out), a prompt directed at anyone claiming to be female within online boards, chats, and forums. This prompt, which bridges “accepted” adolescent immaturity and the most menacing forms of misogyny, points to the pernicious “made by and for men” sentiment that persists in cultural realms both high and low.

Under such hegemonic primacy, male artists tend to be elevated far above their female peers, and the notion of genius is largely reserved for men. This bias resides most resolutely in the discourse surrounding the practice of sculpture, in which an emphasis on grandeur functions as the new phallus of nations, churning out massive works for even more massive sales floors, collections, and institutions.

This exhibition argues against the predominantly patriarchal imagination that has defined sculptural form, and it aims to reveal the energy, intensity, and originality being forged by artists who exchange the emptiness of grand gestures for complexity, criticality, humor, and meaningful gravitas.

Without discrediting or disregarding history, the exhibition makes a case in and for the present—a time when the market has nearly consumed every aspect of the maker—by turning our attention to five contemporary artists whose gestures in form embody the now and point to the new in Sculpture. Spanning three generations, the show introduces emerging artists Kelly Akashi, Nevine Mahmoud, and Kathleen Ryan, alongside established artists Andrea Zittel and Amanda Ross-Ho, illustrating a shift in mentorship and aesthetic lineage that argues against longstanding—and all-too-gendered—systems of artistic valuation and authority.

SOGTFO is curated by Charlie White, with accompanying texts by Sarah Lehrer-Graiwer and Charlie White.

 

 

 

Mike Kuchar

Saints and Sinners

January 17 – February 14 2015

 

Screening of “Sins of the Fleshapoids”

(the first presentation in HD of his 1965 seminal and solo directorial debut)

Every hour, during Business Hours

 

Artforum Critics’ Pick

Press Release

 

 

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

 

 

François Ghebaly is pleased present “Im Different”, Sayre Gomez’ first solo exhibition in Los Angeles.  The exhibition will consist of 4 distinct yet related bodies of work that are all centered around the ideas of ___________ , ______________ , ________ , ________________ , ______________ .  Each body of work is presented within two different yet highly contrived spaces loosely referencing a shopping center with its indoor showroom, and surrounding outdoor garden.

 

In the main gallery, on first steps into “The Hypnotic Presence of Popular Music in Southern California”, the artist’s first large-scale, multi-channel installation. Covering the entire space, the work is comprised of 12 speakers housed within individually painted fiberglass outdoor garden rocks resting on a bed of woodchips. Each respective rock plays a different pop “anthem” sourced from Mark Zuckerberg’s playlist titled Quest, which is publicly accessible on the music streaming platform Spotify.  Further referencing outdoor spaces, painted banners hang on the brick wall of the gallery. Designed by Chicago-based design firm, Struggle Inc., the banners feature various slogans sourced from algorithmically generated “lorem ipsum”, a design industry tool often referred to as dummy text.

 

The remaining walls will present a series of Gomez’ new paintings. The subtle color gradients from dark to light purples and blues range from representation to abstraction, and lead the viewer from the “outdoor” space into the “indoor” space housed in the adjacent room. Gomez’ paintings employ industrial application processes, such as airbrush and automotive paint sprayers, techniques that have historically been used in the film and advertising industries. While the representational paintings of images drawn from different online sharing platforms appear photographic, they are also made to be photographed, a primary intention of the histories being referenced.  The process of his abstract works also share a similar relationship to representation. At first black and white, the  compositions are buried under layers of pigmented varnish creating a sensational “window” from which the abstractions peak through at differing levels of opacity and color.

 

Following the paintings, and entering the Show Room the viewer will encounter two sculptures of identical mid-century northern European designed coffee tables. Constructed from three distinctly different materials and surfaces, they will be adorned with objects commonly found in the homes of ____________, such as ___________,  _____________, and __________.  Near the tables, “Large Plinth with Records” features a patina similar to artist’s abstract paintings, and prominently features a stack of cast vinyl records.  The room will also feature “Uww (Untitled window work)”, in which the artist repurposes a salvaged window as an artwork by installing it directly into the gallery wall. Because of the reflective nature of the glass the window is never without an image. It functions as both an object to look into, and an object to look at. Finally, the large painting “Generation Gap”, features two popular quotes turned slogans from John Lennon and Kurt Cobain.

 

Sayre Gomez holds a BFA from the School of Art Institute of Chicago (2005) and an MFA from CalArts (2008). Recent solo exhibitions include Slippery at The HOLE in New York, This is to Sink at Michael Jon Gallery in Miami, and Windows and Mirrors jointly hosted by Kavi Gupta Gallery and New Capital, in Chicago.  The Artist also co-organized, with JPW3, the exhibition Culm at Night Gallery in Los Angeles, and has recently participated in group exhibitions at Fluxia in Milan, 356 Mission St. in Los Angeles, Clearing in New York, Robert Blumenthal in New York, Nagel/Draxler in Cologne, and Balice Hertling in Paris.  Gomez’s work is included in BRIGHT!: Typography Between Illustration and Art, Published by DAAB, in 2013, and 100 New Artists published in 2012 by Lawrence King, UK. His work has been featured in various publications and blogs such as Artforum Magazine, Artforum.com, Contemporary Art Daily, and Flaunt Magazine.

 

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Sayre Gomez

I’m Different

 

October 10 – November 29 2014

 

Opening Reception:

Friday, October 10

7 – 10PM

 

 

Press Release


LA Times

Artforum

Art Agenda

Artsy

Mousse

 


 

 

Such Appetite

Little Brown Mushroom, 2013

Peeking into the combustible sublime of America’s outer-urban colonies, Such Appetite pairs Charlie White’s intimate study of a teenage girl with poems by Stephanie Ford in a twenty-first century meditation on beauty and banality, adolescence and sprawl. [Acquire]

 

Charlie White, American Minor

JRP | Ringer, 2009

American Minor delves into an important and ongoing theme in White’s work–the American teen, and all that goes into its manufacture. White tackles the taboos of nascent sexuality in the American teen girl–both the vulnerability of that sexuality as a topic and the ruthlessness with which it is exploited when it goes unexamined. Cataloging studio archives, film stills, animation stills and scripts, and using images culled from White’s two-year study of one teenager, archives of magazine covers featuring iconic blonde models, stills from his first 35mm film and his photographic comparative study of teens and transgendered people, American Minor presents White’s ongoing and never before-seen studies of the American teen subject as both image and idea. American Minor is a bold excavation of the sociosexual forces that surround us all. [Acquire]

 

Charlie White, Monsters

PowerHouse Books, 2004

Monsters catalogs White’s photographic work from 1999 to 2006 in full detail. In series such as In a Matter of Days (1999) andUnderstanding Joshua (2001), White created monsters that stand as surrogates for human fragility and the internal demons that haunt our experiences of self and other. In And Jeopardize the Integrity of the Hull (2003), White’s work began to critique photography’s role in popular culture by mimicking and heightening the veneer of the commercial image to reveal the tension below the gloss. White’s most recent series, Everything is American (2006), reveals the violence-tinged eroticism of the American psyche through portraits of both historic and mythic figures. From assaulting scenes to meditative studies, White’s powerful, disturbing, and revelatory photographs create fiction to understand reality and reconsider history to critique the present. [Acquire]

 

Charlie White: Everything is American

Domus Artium, 2006

Published on the occasion of White’s solo exhibition at Domis Artium in Salamanca Spain, CHARLIE WHITE offers a careful overview of his “Evrything is American” series, 2006. The catalog contain 10 unique essays by critic Jan Tumlir, and detialed illustrations of each of the ten works. This Everything is American series reveals the violence-tinged eroticism of the American psyche through portraits of both historic and mythic figures. From assaulting scenes to meditative studies, White’s powerful, disturbing, and revelatory photographs create fiction to understand reality and reconsider history to critique the present. [Acquire]

 

And Jeopardize the Integrity of the Hull

TDM Paris, 2003

And Jeopardize the Integrity of The Hull is a limited edition book that catalogues White’s 2003 series of the same name. Created in the fashion of a children’s board book, this publication features heavy gloss reproductions of the series’ ten photographs on heavy cardboard stock. [Acquire]

 

Charlie White Photographs

Goliath, 2002

White’s first monograph, this publication includes three complete series from 1996 to 2001. With an introduction by Ronald Jones, essays by Annabel Chong, William Deverell and Fred Alan Wolf, and an interview with artist Lisa Anne Auerbach. [Acquire]

 

Hysteric 4

Hysteric Glamour, 2001

This unique book offers 50 images from White’s 1996 pornographic series “Femalien,” which was first published in Cheri magazine. The book is part of an ongoing series in which photographers publish a lesser-known project in its entirety. The book series includes Inoue Seiryu, Cindy Sherman, Jack Pierson, and others. Hysteric 4contains the only reproductions of this entire photographic project, which was exhibited through the vending of Cheri magazine at the Andrea Rosen Gallery in 1996. [Acquire]

 

 

 

François Ghebaly is proud to present Gina Osterloh’s second solo exhibition with the gallery.

For this new exhibition, Osterloh presents a series of works for the camera and the photographic frame applying a set of instructions:

Press

Erase

Outline

Slice

Strike

Make an X

Prick!

In all of Gina Osterloh’s works, the artist’s hand is evident. In her constructed sets – hand drawn lines, dots, voids, shadows, and silhouettes cut into and mark the surface of paper. Through mark making, physical posture, and the deliberate placement of the body within her sets, Osterloh actively questions the underlying structures of photography, its modes of perception, and the recognition of signifiers. Whether the end material object is a photograph, projection screen, or wall, the photographic field becomes the surface of articulation.

On opening night, Osterloh’s own body strikes and slices paper for an audience in her performance Prick, Prick, Prick!. Performed with the presence of artist D. Hill, Osterloh expands her ongoing investigation of call and response relationships between the body and photographic frame, as well as repetition and rhythm produced by speech and actions.

For The Implied Body, Nothing to See Here, There Never Was, Osterloh returns to her interest in the photo series as well as mark making for the camera – bending and playing with the grid structure that she looks through on the ground glass of her large format view camera. The conceptual set of moves or instructions applied to the body is in turn applied to the structure of looking itself.

Akin to a photographic time lapse and perhaps the most singular photograph in the exhibition, Drawing for the Camera is a series of free hand, curving line drawings on photo backdrop paper created for the camera.

In gallery #2, Osterloh presents her new 16mm film Press and Outline, in which the artist presses into and outlines her own shadow. Both odd as well as intimate – the physical body and its shadow simultaneously oppose and support each other, and at times are rendered indiscernible.

For more information, please contact the gallery at info@ghebaly.com

 

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Gina Osterloh

PRESS ERASE OUTLINE SLICE STRIKE MAKE AN X PRICK!

 

 

July 19 – August 16

 

Opening Reception:

Saturday July 19 ; 6 – 10PM

Performance 8PM

 

 

Press Release

Artforum Review, 2014

Art LTD, 2014

 


 


 

 

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

 

 

With works and contributions by: Lisa Anne Auerbach (USA), Davide Balula (France), Dan Bayles (USA), Neïl Beloufa (Algeria & France), Edwin Chan (Hong Kong – United States), Thomas Altheimer (Tom Dane) (Denmark), Cem Dinlenmiş (Turkey), Nilbar Güreş (Turkey), Hatice Güleryüz (Turkey), Ivan Grubanov (Serbia), Michael Hardt (USA), Thomas Hirschhorn (Switzerland), Nikita Kadan (Ukraine), Joel Kyack (USA), Sylvère Lotringer (foreign agent), Pode Bal (Czech Republic), Ariel Schlesinger (Israel), Slavs and Tatars (various), Extrastruggle (Turkey), thepeople71 (various), Sergio Torres-Torres (Mexico/USA), Mona Vatamanu & Florin Tudor (Romania & Switzerland), Andra Ursuta (Romania).

 

In Turkey last June, hundreds of thousands of citizens went to Taksim Square to protest against their government’s plan to remove this beloved public park and build a shopping center instead. The protesters named their movement “Occupy Gezi” in reference to the Occupy Wall Street movement (OWS), which spread around US cities in 2011. The OWS movement itself was inspired by the Arab Spring that happened the same year, when every day people from Tunisia to Egypt, from Lebanon to Syria, went to the street against their repressive regimes. It appears that these cycles of struggles [1] have inspired one another, going back to all major social uprisings of our collective memory since the 1960s.

 

Demonstrations throughout the 20th century were traditionally organized along an avenue, a straight line with a beginning and an end. But these recent movements have been sedentary, and tend to use a strategy of encampment or occupation. In the past 3 years, in Egypt (Tahrir), Turkey (Taksim), Ukraine (Maidan), the United States (Wall Street), Venezuela (Altamira), and many others countries, people have expressed their anger by taking over iconic public squares and plaza, and naming their movement after this symbolic act.

 

“Square(s)” will put together an international group of artists whom, using various practices and aesthetics, share a common awareness of these ongoing events. While this exhibition is not about partisan politics, it is an attempt to recreate a few different active public squares within a gallery space in Los Angeles, a city where the concept of public space is virtually non-existent.  In this context, the works exhibited will simply function as the dissident voices of an occupied space.

 

The exhibition will invite and provoke different perspectives from the artists invited, as well as the audience and other participants in the project, such as writers, architects and activists. As it happens with protestors in the street, the works exhibited will move to new positions and redefine themselves. On June 28th a program of events related to the exhibition will include, among others, interventions by Davide Balula and Tom Dane, a talk, with, among others, architect Edwin Chan & Semiotext(e) founder Sylvère Lotringer, a program of videos screenings, and the launch of a new political party, “thepeople71”.

 

More content and programming will be posted on a blog, specially created for the occasion (www.squaresexhibition.wordpress.com).

 

“Public spaces are political arenas in which power is gained, recognized, underwritten, disputed, attacked, lost and gained”.  Adrian Piper

“The King must die, so the people can live” Maximilien Robespierre

 

 

Organized in collaboration with independent critic and curator Yann Perreau.

 

[1] Michael Hardt and Toni Negri in their essay “Declaration”.

 

 

 

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Square(s)


June 14th – July 12th

 

Preview walk-through:
Saturday June 14th from 2pm – 6pm

 

Performances, talks and screenings all day:
Saturday June 28th

 

Press Release

Public Space Press Release